As part of SIBSU project activity no. 1, the first four manuals regarding the best practices of representatives of the Slovak and Ukrainian border police and the customs administration were published. The publications cover topics related to the use of technologies in the process of customs control, current trends in detection of illegal import and export of cash, human trafficking and current trends in the training of service dogs of the financial administration to detect the illegal import of goods.

Manuals in both Slovak and Ukrainian language can be found in the PUBLICATIONS section.

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Alexander Duleba from the Slovak Foreign Policy Association (SFPA) points out that the Slovak-Ukrainian border has a huge untapped potential for joint projects that could bring a new quality of life to people on both sides of the border.

 

The war in Ukraine, of course, changed all plans, but the space for the development of close cross-border cooperation is still there. Slovak municipalities could develop a number of useful projects with Ukrainian regions in the field of public transport, tourism, education, business and other sectors.

 

You will find out in the attached video interview why such cooperation does not work today, and how it is with the current level of corruption in Ukraine, which is an obstacle to the development of economic relations.

The interview took place within the project Safe and Inclusive Border SK-UA (SIBSU). The project is implemented by the Border and Alien Police Office in cooperation with the Border Service of Ukraine, SFPA, the Uzhhorod Regional Risk Analysis Center and the Norwegian partner Apenhet (transparency).

In recent years, Ukraine adopted a number of reforms that brought it closer to EU standards in the areas of democracy, rule of law, economy and trade. However, it is still a country where higher mistrust of banks and concerns about exchange rate risk persisted. 'That's why many people kept a lot of money in cash even if it was completely legal,' explains Andrej Leontiev, an advocate from Taylor Wessing Slovakia.

 

How is the origin of money proven at a time when war is raging in Ukraine? And why is cash in the suitcase for many Ukrainians literally a necessity for survival in Slovakia? You can find out in the attached video interview.

The interview took place within the project Safe and Inclusive Border SK-UA (SIBSU). The project is implemented by the Border and Alien Police Office in cooperation with the Border Service of Ukraine, SFPA, the Uzhhorod Regional Risk Analysis Center and the Norwegian partner Apenhet (transparency).

Robert Gucký, director of the Border Police Office, explains in an interview that although the war in Ukraine is not over, the flow of migration is already beginning to turn: 'We have days when more people leave Slovakia back to Ukraine as vice versa.' About two thousand refugees from Ukraine come to Slovakia every day.

You will find out in the attached video interview how the Slovak-Ukrainian border is technically secured and how the number of illegal migrants entering Slovakia via Ukraine has changed.

The interview took place within the project Safe and Inclusive Border SK-UA (SIBSU). The project is implemented by the Border and Alien Police Office in cooperation with the Border Service of Ukraine, SFPA, the Uzhhorod Regional Risk Analysis Center and the Norwegian partner Apenhet (transparency).

On 4th of October, we commenced the first in-person activity - "Language courses"; where our participants would improve their Slovak and Ukrainian language skills during the whole week. 

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introducing our most recent partner joining our project

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REGIONAL RISKS ANALYTICS CENTER

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